downcast


downcast
downcast, dispirited, dejected, depressed, disconsolate, woebegone mean affected by or showing very low spirits.
Downcast implies a being overcome by shame, mortification, or loss of hope or confidence; it usually suggests an inability to face others or an utter lack of cheerfulness
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his abstraction, and downcast, but not melancholy, air— Meredith

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she comes into the room very determinedly: the two men, perplexed and ddwncast, following her— Shaw

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Dispirited implies extreme low-spiritedness occasioned by failure to accomplish or to get what one wants or to achieve what one wishes to attain; it usually implies discouragement or a being disheartened
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he, dispirited, left the talking all to her— Meredith

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dispirited by their futile efforts— Grandgent

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sick and dispirited, he gave up his Arabian plan and started on the return voyage to Italy— Buchan

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Dejected implies greater prostration of the spirits than either downcast or dispirited with sudden but often temporary loss of hope, courage, or vigor (Catherine took up her work directly, saying, in a dejected voice, that her head did not run upon Bath — much— Austen)
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I may, as I lie on the sand, be happy, dejected, in vacant or in pensive mood— Lowes

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Depressed suggests a sinking under a heavy weight or a burden too great to be borne; it may express a temporary or a chronic mood or reaction and may, unlike the other terms of this group, indicate a serious inability to be normally active and happy
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depressed by his failures to the point of suicide

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my spirits have been more depressed than is common, even with me— Cowper

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when nothing happens they become sad and depressedAnderson

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Disconsolate fundamentally implies comfortlessness and carries a strong suggestion of being inconsolable or exceptionally uncomfortable; it may sometimes suggest no more than a frame of mind in which depression and disappointment are associated with discomfort or grief
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the Jews sat disconsolate on the poop; they complained much of the cold they had suffered in their exposed situation— Borrow

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Adrian hurried after Richard in an extremely disconsolate state of mind. Not to be at the breakfast and see the best of the fun, disgusted him— Meredith

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Woebegone usually suggests a frame of mind but it emphasizes the impression of dejection and defeat produced on an observer not only by the facial expression and posture of the one observed but also by his surroundings or quarters: it may imply dejection, depression, or merely discouragement in the persons affected or desolation or dilapidation in their surroundings, but the overall impression is that of a defeated, spiritless condition
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it was the most woebegone farm I had ever seen

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the woebegone expression on the countenances of the little children

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a poor mendicant approached, old and woebegoneLockhart

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Analogous words: weighed down, oppressed (see DEPRESS): distressed, troubled (see TROUBLE vb): *despondent, forlorn
Antonyms: elated
Contrasted words: cheerful, happy, joyous (see GLAD)

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Downcast — Down cast , n. 1. Downcast or melancholy look. [1913 Webster] That downcast of thine eye. Beau. & Fl. [1913 Webster] 2. (Mining) A ventilating shaft down which the air passes in circulating through a mine. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • downcast — down cast , a. Cast downward; directed to the ground, from bashfulness, modesty, dejection, or guilt. [1913 Webster] T is love, said she; and then my downcast eyes, And guilty dumbness, witnessed my surprise. Dryden. 2. depressed; dispirited;… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • downcast — (adj.) c.1600, from pp. of obs. verb downcast (c.1300), from DOWN (Cf. down) (adv.) + CAST (Cf. cast) (v.). Literal at first; figurative sense is 1630s …   Etymology dictionary

  • downcast — index despondent, disconsolate, lugubrious, pessimistic Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

  • downcast — [adj] depressed, unhappy bad, blue, brooding, bummed out*, cast down, chapfallen, cheerless, crestfallen, daunted, dejected, despondent, disappointed, disconsolate, discouraged, disheartened, dismayed, dispirited, distressed, doleful, down,… …   New thesaurus

  • downcast — ► ADJECTIVE 1) (of eyes) looking downwards. 2) feeling despondent …   English terms dictionary

  • downcast — [doun′kast΄] adj. 1. directed downward 2. very unhappy or discouraged; sad; dejected …   English World dictionary

  • downcast — [[t]da͟ʊnkɑːst, kæst[/t]] 1) ADJ GRADED: usu v link ADJ If you are downcast, you are feeling sad and without hope. Barbara looked increasingly downcast as defeat loomed. ...a glum, downcast expression. Syn: dejected 2) ADJ: usu v link ADJ If your …   English dictionary

  • downcast — down|cast [ˈdaunka:st US kæst] adj 1.) sad or upset because of something bad that has happened 2.) downcast eyes are looking down ▪ Penelope sat silently, her eyes downcast …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • downcast — adjective 1 sad or upset because of something bad that has happened: Keith is very downcast at the moment he misses his wife terribly. 2 downcast eyes are looking down …   Longman dictionary of contemporary English


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